CLOSE
   PRESS TO        NAVIGATE  
CLOSE

Thank you for your enquiry.
We will endeavour to get back to you as soon as possible.


Alternatively, email enquiries@crosstrees.house
and we will endeavour to get back to you
as soon as possible.

You can make an immediate enquiry by
filling in the online form above.

CONTACT US

   MAKE AN ENQUIRY HERE...

Your business, like the fastest sailing ship... requires Crosstrees

to build the sturdiest, and tallest of masts. Enabling you

to unfurl your strongest sail, Crosstrees carry you through

the calmest of oceans and the stormiest of weathers.

THE CROSSTREES

Why CROSSTREES HOUSE?

Crosstrees are two horizontal crosspieces of timber or metal that spread

the upper sails of a sailing ship in order to support the mast.

They allow the extension of height, effectively enabling the addition

of more sail shroud. This harnesses more wind power,

and therefore gives further speed to a ship.

THE GLENLEE (1896)

MOORED AT GLASGOW’S RIVERSIDE MUSEUM

The CROSSTREES HOUSE name is a nod to Glasgow’s

rich history of shipbuilding and international trade. We summoned

this centuries~spanning inspiration, and invoked the entrepreneurial

spirit that pervaded these legendary ‘Clydebuilt’ sailing ships.

One of the most famous merchant sailing ships being

the Cutty Sark ~ of the last tea clippers to be built on the

Clyde (1869), she was one of the fastest.

Increased trade called for newer, faster ships, whereupon Scotland

became shipbuilder to the world. From the founding of the

Scott family’s shipyard at Greenock in the year 1712 to the present

day over 25,000 ships have been built on the River Clyde

and its Firth, and on the tributary River Kelvin.

BRITISH TALL SHIPS

OFF
THE COAST OF JAVA - 1860s

PAINTED BY: ABRAHAM SALM

Glasgow’s easy access to the Atlantic Ocean by merchant

ships allowed the worldwide importation of goods, which were

then traded throughout the United Kingdom and Europe.

Through the success of this trade, Glasgow became

one of the largest cities in the world.

SHIPPING ON THE CLYDE (1881)

PAINTED BY: JOHN ATKINSON GRIMSHAW

Recognised as ‘The Second City of the Empire’, Glasgow

historically became an indispensable shipbuilding and trading centre,

with its primary river, the River Clyde, providing access

to the city and the rest of Scotland for merchant shipping.

OUR STORY

Awwwards
Sorry this website requires JavaScript to be enabled to work correctly!